Veterinary confessions: In control ... or out?

Veterinary confessions: In control ... or out?

We selected confessions from the Vet Confessionals Project that reflect the feelings of control (or lack thereof) that plague the profession.
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Jul 07, 2017
By dvm360.com staff

Some people, even in bad circumstances, feel they have control over their lives. Psychologist Julian Rotter calls that an "internal" locus of control. Compare that to people who feel they don't have power over their lives, their actions, their families or their jobs—people with an "external locus of control." (Learn more about that 'out of control' feeling in veterinary medicine, here.)

Take the quiz! Do you think your veterinary career is in your hands ... or out of your hands? Let's explore your beliefs about your "locus of control," the idea that either external or internal factors decide your success. Here's how.

We selected a few confessions on this idea of and internal vs. an external locus of control. 

"It took me 17 years to leave a toxic work environment. You are in control of your happiness. If you are not happy at your place, find a new one!"

"As a single mom I feel trapped in this field. I love being a vet but, despite what you may read, it is not a field that provides good work-life balance. It is also not a field where your education allows you to switch careers to a more family friendly one. What else am I qualified to do?"

"3 types of people: 1) Those who make things happen. 2) Those who watch what happens. 3) Those who wonder what happened. I like No. 3."

"I have been in the profession for 2 years and I don't get the anxiety-ridden feelings most of my peers do because I perpetually distance myself from people's problems. I'm not unfeeling but I refuse to take my work home with me emotionally. I value my own state of mind!!"

"Remember that this profession is a choice. You can choose to be miserable or you can choose to be happy. Find your happy." 

"Sometimes I'm not really sure where life is leading. I'm just a kennel tech now, but it's nice to know that people at all levels of the vet profession are going through the same thing. It's not easy doing what we do, and it's exhausting."